Very last chance to see…. wonderful…

…exhibition by Olafur Eliasson In Real Life at Tate Modern. It ends on 5th January, so if you live in or near to London and have a little spare time I strongly recommend that you go (but check ticket availability first, this is a VERY popular show and there are only a few days left so tickets might be hard to come by ).

People may remember Danish-Icelandic Eliasson’s brilliant, single The Weather Project bringing sunrise to the Turbine Hall of this same gallery some years ago and he has returned since then with his blocks of Greenland ice melting on the Thames-side forecourt in Ice-Watch to illustrate and draw attention to global warming, but this is a major show. It can be found on Level 2 of the newer part of the Tate ( although there is also a waterfall/fountain to be seen outside in courtyard ).

The first room is a collection of Eliasson’s models for larger works, often created with mathematician collaborator Einar Thorsteinn. Many of them are beautiful in themselves with lots of natural shapes, based, one imagines, on fibonacci sequences.  One model is of a finished work Your spiral view (2002) shown later in this exhibition. Room 2 contains early works and already we see the cleverness and simplicity of Eliasson. Window projection (1990) has the silhouette of a window shone, in light, on to a wall. At first sight the viewer imagines the light is coming through a window from outside, but no, there are no windows it’s just a lamp with a cutout on its lens. In Rainwindow (1999) the artists uses a real window but recreates the effect of the weather. These are typical of Eliasson’s interest in light and weather.

Room 2 also contains trickery in mirrors and glass, an insect’s eye glass and a mirror which is actually a hole.  This leads on to the Kaleidoscopes Room ( via a very interesting corridor which challenges the senses – I’ll say no more ). Here there are hanging reflective spheres and a walk-through corridor of reflections. Thence to a room with a projected, slowly transmuting image – all calm and tranquillity – followed by a room full of energy in which viewers find themselves part of an ever-changing art work on one of the white walls. It is so simple it seems effortless, but of course it isn’t.  Like Big bang fountain which is found in a small curtained-off room with no light at all save for a periodic strobe which illuminates a fountain, freezing the water into silver metallic images before the viewers’ eyes.

This exhibition is child friendly and there were plenty there today, many eagerly experiencing the changing light and reflections, most especially in the room with the mirrored ceiling and an, apparently, circular sculpture. This exhibition is also great fun (but heels are not a good idea ).

There are serious points to be made with the twenty year sequence of photographs showing the withdrawl of the ice-cap in Iceland and very beautiful works capturing the impact of melting ice on paint wash and colour discs which use the palette from two of Caspar David Friedrich’s romantic nature paintings. In The Expanded Studio room we see the genesis and development of a number of projects, the design and creation of a solar powered light, the measuring of the disappearing ice and other environmentally engaged work, through film, artefact and notes.

It’s impossible to describe it all. Suffice to say that the visitor will come away with a new perspective on how one uses one’s senses, especially sight, as well as having learned a lot ( I certainly did ).  I have been wanting to see this exhibition since it opened and I’m glad I caught it. I’m only sorry that I didn’t go before and could return again!

Olafur Eliasson In Real Life is at Tate Modern until 5th January. It costs £18 for non-members and is worth every penny.

For more on Art see    Portrait of an artist        Bonnard Colours       Zubaran Impossible Light 

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